Trying out Gyoza for Cheap at Harajuku Gyozaro

If gyoza is your thing, better check out this popular gyoza place near Harajuku / Omotesando area.
Pan fried gyoza at Harajuku Gyozaro

I’m a sucker for gyoza so I’ve been on the lookout for the best (and equally affordable) gyoza in Tokyo and went down Google’s rabbit hole that led me to this place in the posh and quirky Harajuku-slash-Omotesando area near Shibuya – it’s called Harajuku Gyozaro – and for a restaurant that only has gyoza on their menu – they must be great, right?

Harajuku Gyozaro is located just in the inner streets of Omotesando – be sure to use your maps app to get directions to this restaurant as the narrow winding roads in the inner streets of Omotesando can be a bit confusing. Although it’s in the inner parts of Omotedando, you won’t get bored as there are lots of restaurants, ice cream parlors, and clothes shops along the streets, enough to keep you entertained as you find this gyoza spot.

Walking along Omotesando street
You get to walk through and explore the posh Omotesando area on your way to Harajuku Gyozaro.

To get to Harajuku Gyozaro you can stop by these stations:

  • From Harajuku Station (JR): Take a leisurely stroll through the bustling and ultra-kawaii Takeshita Street, offering a glimpse into Tokyo’s eccentric youth culture.
  • From Meiji-Jingumae Station (Tokyo Metro): This is a shorter walk, but you’ll miss the Takeshita Street experience.

The Harajuku Gyozaro Experience

The internet says that you have to expect to queue for at least an hour or so to get your hands on Harajuku Gyozaro’s dumplings but when I went just around 2PM which was just after lunch, I was surprised that there wasn’t a queue at all when I went – lucky me! 🙂 Or maybe I just had to go right after lunch when everyone’s done eating.

Waiting in line at Harajuku Gyozaro
There were just a few people in queue when I went. 🙂

Although there was no queue, the place was packed. It was cozy on the inside, with just the standard bar area which was the main focal point of the restaurant and some family seats on the side.

There was a seat available in the bar area so I sat myself and got ready to order – note: if you plan to come here, make sure to sit in the bar area (right where the people in the photo below were seated) because this is where you get front-row seats and witness how they cook their gyoza.

Inside Harajuku Gyozaro
Although I was seated at the bar area, I had a semi-obstructed view of the cooking show. Better get a seat right where these people are at – they were just mesmerized by the gyoza cooking all throughout.

The menu at Harajuku Gyozaro

Harajuku Gyozaro’s menu is simple and straightforward, focusing on the humble yet heavenly gyoza as the main star of their restaurant.

You can choose either steamed or fried gyoza dumplings – as for the fillings you can go with or without garlic and chives. If you want a deeper flavor, definitely get their shiso (Japanese basil) gyoza.

The menu at Harajuku Gyozaro_Page 1

As for the price, ¥340 for a 6-piece serving of their gyoza is not bad and affordable enough – other restaurants serve (albeit more elevated) gyoza for ¥700, so Harajuku Gyozaro’s pricing is cheap enough, especially considering the fact that they’re located in the posh Omotesando / Harajuku area.

The menu at Harajuku Gyozaro_Page 2
You can also add on any item from their side menu for only ¥295 each.

I ordered the pan-fried gyoza with garlic and chives (only ¥340 for 6 pieces). The dumplings were delicious, with a juicy and satisfying filling. The sauce was flavorful and definitely elevated the taste of the gyoza. If there was one thing, it was that the gyoza bottoms were not crispy enough as I would’ve liked it. If you come here to order make sure to ask for crispier bottoms when you order if that’s your preference.

Pan fried gyoza at Harajuku Gyozaro
Juicy gyoza filling at Harajuku Gyozaro
The still piping hot and juicy gyoza filling went really well with their sauce.

I also ordered Kirin beer to pair with my gyoza and they were no doubt the perfect combination – imagine chowing down on juicy pan-fried gyoza dumplings on a balmy afternoon in Tokyo – saikou!

Kirin Beer served at Harajuku Gyozaro

If you’re particularly into gyoza, this might be the place for you. At ¥340 for 6 pieces, it’s one of the cheaper gyoza-focused restaurants in Tokyo – it’s cheap and simple, yet so flavorful and satisfying. And the vibe and location of the restaurant is one other thing that makes Harajuku Gyozaro worth a visit.

Have any questions, or tips to share? Feel free to comment down below! 🙂

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Pan fried gyoza at Harajuku Gyozaro

Trying out Gyoza for Cheap at Harajuku Gyozaro

If gyoza is your thing, better check out this popular gyoza place near Harajuku / Omotesando area.

I’m a sucker for gyoza so I’ve been on the lookout for the best (and equally affordable) gyoza in Tokyo and went down Google’s rabbit hole that led me to this place in the posh and quirky Harajuku-slash-Omotesando area near Shibuya – it’s called Harajuku Gyozaro – and for a restaurant that only has gyoza on their menu – they must be great, right?

Harajuku Gyozaro is located just in the inner streets of Omotesando – be sure to use your maps app to get directions to this restaurant as the narrow winding roads in the inner streets of Omotesando can be a bit confusing. Although it’s in the inner parts of Omotedando, you won’t get bored as there are lots of restaurants, ice cream parlors, and clothes shops along the streets, enough to keep you entertained as you find this gyoza spot.

Walking along Omotesando street
You get to walk through and explore the posh Omotesando area on your way to Harajuku Gyozaro.

To get to Harajuku Gyozaro you can stop by these stations:

  • From Harajuku Station (JR): Take a leisurely stroll through the bustling and ultra-kawaii Takeshita Street, offering a glimpse into Tokyo’s eccentric youth culture.
  • From Meiji-Jingumae Station (Tokyo Metro): This is a shorter walk, but you’ll miss the Takeshita Street experience.

The Harajuku Gyozaro Experience

The internet says that you have to expect to queue for at least an hour or so to get your hands on Harajuku Gyozaro’s dumplings but when I went just around 2PM which was just after lunch, I was surprised that there wasn’t a queue at all when I went – lucky me! 🙂 Or maybe I just had to go right after lunch when everyone’s done eating.

Waiting in line at Harajuku Gyozaro
There were just a few people in queue when I went. 🙂

Although there was no queue, the place was packed. It was cozy on the inside, with just the standard bar area which was the main focal point of the restaurant and some family seats on the side.

There was a seat available in the bar area so I sat myself and got ready to order – note: if you plan to come here, make sure to sit in the bar area (right where the people in the photo below were seated) because this is where you get front-row seats and witness how they cook their gyoza.

Inside Harajuku Gyozaro
Although I was seated at the bar area, I had a semi-obstructed view of the cooking show. Better get a seat right where these people are at – they were just mesmerized by the gyoza cooking all throughout.

The menu at Harajuku Gyozaro

Harajuku Gyozaro’s menu is simple and straightforward, focusing on the humble yet heavenly gyoza as the main star of their restaurant.

You can choose either steamed or fried gyoza dumplings – as for the fillings you can go with or without garlic and chives. If you want a deeper flavor, definitely get their shiso (Japanese basil) gyoza.

The menu at Harajuku Gyozaro_Page 1

As for the price, ¥340 for a 6-piece serving of their gyoza is not bad and affordable enough – other restaurants serve (albeit more elevated) gyoza for ¥700, so Harajuku Gyozaro’s pricing is cheap enough, especially considering the fact that they’re located in the posh Omotesando / Harajuku area.

The menu at Harajuku Gyozaro_Page 2
You can also add on any item from their side menu for only ¥295 each.

I ordered the pan-fried gyoza with garlic and chives (only ¥340 for 6 pieces). The dumplings were delicious, with a juicy and satisfying filling. The sauce was flavorful and definitely elevated the taste of the gyoza. If there was one thing, it was that the gyoza bottoms were not crispy enough as I would’ve liked it. If you come here to order make sure to ask for crispier bottoms when you order if that’s your preference.

Pan fried gyoza at Harajuku Gyozaro
Juicy gyoza filling at Harajuku Gyozaro
The still piping hot and juicy gyoza filling went really well with their sauce.

I also ordered Kirin beer to pair with my gyoza and they were no doubt the perfect combination – imagine chowing down on juicy pan-fried gyoza dumplings on a balmy afternoon in Tokyo – saikou!

Kirin Beer served at Harajuku Gyozaro

If you’re particularly into gyoza, this might be the place for you. At ¥340 for 6 pieces, it’s one of the cheaper gyoza-focused restaurants in Tokyo – it’s cheap and simple, yet so flavorful and satisfying. And the vibe and location of the restaurant is one other thing that makes Harajuku Gyozaro worth a visit.

Have any questions, or tips to share? Feel free to comment down below! 🙂

Related Posts

Leave the first comment